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Full text of "College of Veterinary Medicine .."

UNIVERSITY «» * « 
OF ILLINOIS 



1 * III 






OF VETERINARY 
MEDICINE 




University of Illinois Bulletin 



1963-1965 



University of Illinois Bulletin. Volume 60, Number 39; December, 1962. 
Published nine times each month by the University of Illinois. Entered 
as second-class matter December 11, 1912, at the post office at Urbana, 
Illinois, under the Act of August 24, 1912. Office of Publication, 49 
Administration Building (West), Urbana, Illinois. 



COLLEGE 

OF VETERINARY 

MEDICINE 



1963-1965 



CONTENTS 

BOARD OF TRUSTEES 5 

OFFICERS OF ADMINISTRATION 5 

FACULTY OF THE COLLEGE OF VETERINARY MEDICINE 6 

COLLEGE OF VETERINARY MEDICINE 9 

OBJECTIVES 10 

FACILITIES 11 

ADMISSION REQUIREMENTS 13 

THE CURRICULUM 14 

GRADUATION REQUIREMENTS 18 

GRADING SYSTEM 13 

TUITION AND FEES 18 

SCHOLARSHIPS AND LOANS 18 

AWARDS 24 

GRADUATE STUDY 25 

STUDENT HEALTH SERVICE 25 

STUDENT EMPLOYMENT 25 

LIVING ARRANGEMENTS 26 

ORGANIZATIONS 26 

RECREATIONAL ACTIVITIES 27 

OPPORTUNITIES FOR VETERINARIANS 28 



Digitized by the Internet Archive 
in 2013 



http://archive.org/details/collegeofveteri6365univ 



BOARD OF TRUSTEES 



MEMBERS EX OFFICIO 

Otto Kerner, Governor of Illinois Springfield 

Ray Page, Superintendent of Public Instruction Springfield 

ELECTED MEMBERS 

Term 1957-1963 

Earl M. Hughes Hughes Farms, Route 1, Woodstock 

Wayne A. Johnston 135 E. Eleventh Place, Chicago 5 

Timothy W. Swain 912 Central National Bank Building, Peoria 2 

Term 1959-1965 

Howard W. Clement 38 S. Dearborn Street, Chicago 3 

Richard A. Harewood 733 E. Seventy-fifth Street, Chicago 19 

(resignation effective July 30, 1962) 
Harold Pogue 705 N. Oakland Avenue, Decatur 

Term 1961-1967 

Irving Dilliard 407 Crestwood Drive, Collinsville 

Mrs. Frances B. Watkins 5538 Harper Avenue, Chicago 37 

Kenney E. Williamson Sixth Floor, Lehmann Building, Peoria 2 

OFFICERS OF THE BOARD 

Howard W. Clement, President Chicago 

Anthony J. Janata, Secretary Urbana 

Herbert O. Farber, Comptroller Urbana 

Clarence W. Weldon, Treasurer Chicago 



OFFICERS OF ADMINISTRATION 

David Dodds Henry, Ph.D., LL.D., HH.D., Litt.D., L.H.D., D.Sc.Ed., Ped.D, 
President of the University 

Lyle H. Lanier, Ph.D., Executive Vice-President and Provost 

Herbert Otis Farber, A.M., C.P.A., Vice-President and Comptroller 

Anthony James Janata, A.B., Executive Assistant to the President 

Frederick Theodore Wall, Ph.D., Dean of the Graduate College 

Fred Harold Turner, Ph.D., Dean of Students 

Charles Wilson Sanford, Ph.D., Dean of Admissions and Records 



THE FACULTY OF THE COLLEGE OF VETERINARY MEDICINE 

Carl Alfred Brandly, D.V.M., M.S., Dean of the College; Professor of Veterinary 

Microbiology and Public Health; Director, Center for Zoonoses Research 
Robert Graham, B.S., D.V.M., Dean of the College and Professor of Veterinary 

Pathology and Hygiene, Emeritus 
Joseph Ortan Alberts, V.M.D., Ph.D., Professor of Veterinary Pathology and 

Hygiene; Head of Department 
Richard David Andrews, M.S., Assistant in Veterinary Pathology and Hygiene 
Paul Donald Beamer, D.V.M., Ph.D., Professor of Veterinary Pathology and 

Hygiene 
Loyd Edwin Boley, D.V.M., M.S., Professor of Veterinary Clinical Medicine; 

Head of Department; Assistant Dean of the College 
Bruce Orr Brodie, D.V.M., M.S., Assistant Professor of Veterinary Clinical 

Medicine 
Marvin Theodore Case, B.S., D.V.M., Instructor in Veterinary Pathology and 

Hygiene 
Marion Emeline Compton, B.S., R.N., Assistant in Veterinary Pathology and 

Hygiene 
Denzil Ellis Dees, D.V.M., M.S., Instructor in Veterinary Anatomy and 

Histology 
James Garfield Eagelman, V.M.D., Assistant Professor of Veterinary Clinical 

Medicine 
Deam Hunter Ferris, Ph.D., Associate Professor of Veterinary Pathology and 

Hygiene 
Leroy Dryden Fothergill, M.D., Professor of Epidemiology; Associate Director, 

Center for Zoonoses Research 
Jennifer Gossling, A.B., Assistant in Veterinary Pathology and Hygiene 
Harold Winford Hannah, B.S., LL.B., Professor of Veterinary Medical Law 
Lyle Eugene Hanson, D.V.M., Ph.D., Professor of Veterinary Pathology and 

Hygiene 
Harry Jr. Hardenbrook, D.V.M., Ph.D., Professor of Veterinary Clinical 

Medicine 
Sarah Kyle Harding, M.S., Research Associate in Veterinary Pathology and 

Hygiene 
Ray Davenport Hatch, D.V.M., M.S., Professor of Veterinary Clinical Medicine 
Lloyd Champ Helper, D.V.M., M.S., Assistant Professor of Veterinary Clinical 

Medicine 
Frederick Black Hembrough, D.V.M., M.S., Instructor in Veterinary Physiology 

and Pharmacology 
William George Huber, D.V.M., Ph.D., Assistant Professor of Veterinary Physi- 
ology and Pharmacology 
Virginia Ruth Ivens, B.S., Instructor in Veterinary Pathology and Hygiene 
NoRMAM Dion Levine, Ph.D., Professor of Veterinary Parasitology 
Roger Paul Link, D.V.M., Ph.D., Professor of Veterinary Physiology and Phar- 
macology; Head of Department 
DraGUTIN MAKSIC, D.V.M., Associate Professor of Veterinary Clinical Medicine 
( ).m ParKASH Mai.hotra, B.V.Sc, Ph.D., Instructor in Veterinary Physiology and 

Pharmacology 
John PATRICK Manning, D.V.M., M.S., Assistant Professor of Veterinary Clinical 

Ml (Ik i ii< 
Manford EDWARD MANSFIELD, B.S., D.V.M., Professor of Veterinary Extension 
William CHARLES MaRQUARDT, Ph.D., Associate Professor of Veterinary Pathology 

and Hygiene 

WaLTEI LOY MYERS, D.V.M., Ph.D., Assistant Professor of Veterinary Pathology 

and Hygiene 



Diane Kilbourne Normandin, M.S., Instructor in Veterinary Anatomy and 

Histology 
Richard Albert Notzold, Ph.D., Instructor in Veterinary Anatomy and Histology 
Raymond Edgar Olsen, D.V.M., M.S., Instructor in Veterinary Pathology and 

Hygiene 
Jutta Oppermann, A.B., Assistant in Veterinary Pathology and Hygiene 
Waldir Marinho Pedersoli, D.V.M., Instructor in Veterinary Physiology and 

Pharmacology 
Thomas Neil Phillips, D.V.M., M.S., Assistant Professor of Veterinary Clinical 

Medicine 
Jesse Ronald Pickard, D.V.M., M.S., Associate Professor of Veterinary Extension 
Cynthia Browne Placek, B.S., Assistant Editor (with rank of Assistant) 
James Armer Porter, Jr., D.V.M., M.P.H., Instructor, Veterinary Extension 
Pillarisetty J. Rao, B.V.Sc, M.A., Instructor in Veterinary Pathology and 

Hygiene 
Elwood Frank Reber, Ph.D., Professor of Veterinary Physiology and Pharma- 
cology 
James Richard Reilly, M.S., Instructor in Veterinary Pathology and Hygiene 
Harry Aaron Reynolds, Jr., A.B., V.M.D., Instructor in Veterinary Pathology 

and Hygiene 
Harry Elmer Rhoades, M.S., Assistant Professor of Veterinary Pathology and 

Hygiene 
Miodrag Ristic, D.V.M., Ph.D., Professor of Veterinary Pathology and Hygiene 
John Paul Rosborough, D.V.M., M.S., Instructor in Veterinary Physiology and 

Pharmacology 
Alvin Harold Safanie, D.V.M., Ph.D., Assistant Professor of Veterinary Anatomy 

and Histology 
Lorenz Edward St. Clair, D.V.M., Ph.D., Professor of Veterinary Anatomy and 

Histology; Head of Department 
Jesse Sampson, D.V.M., Ph.D., Professor of Veterinary Physiology and Pharma- 
cology, Emeritus 
Alfred George Schiller, D.V.M., M.S., Associate Professor of Veterinary Clinical 

Medicine 
John Edward Schmidt, D.V.M., Instructor in Veterinary Anatomy and Histology 
Diego Segre, D.V.M., Ph.D., Professor of Veterinary Microbiology and Public 

Health and Veterinary Research 
Gaylord Edward Shaw, A.B., Assistant in Veterinary Pathology and Hygiene 
Stevan Sibinovic, D.V.M., Research Assistant in Veterinary Pathology and 

Hygiene 
Joseph Simon, D.V.M., Ph.D., Professor of Veterinary Pathology and Hygiene 
Erwin Small, B.S., D.V.M., Instructor in Veterinary Clinical Medicine 
John Carl Thurmon, B.S., D.V.M., Instructor in Veterinary Clinical Medicine 
Arthur Robert Twardock, D.V.M., Ph.D., Assistant Professor of Veterinary 

Physiology and Pharmacology 
Guang-Tsan Wang, B.S., Assistant in Veterinary Pathology and Hygiene 
Adolf Michael Watrach, M.R.C.V.S., Ph.D., Professor of Veterinary Pathology 

and Hygiene 
Marian Ann Watrach, M.S., Research Associate in Veterinary Pathology and 

Hygiene 
Marilyn Wingard, A.B., Assistant in Veterinary Pathology and Hygiene 
JoAnne L. Weaver, A.M., Assistant in Veterinary Pathology and Hygiene 
George Theodore Woods, D.V.M., M.P.H., M.S., Associate Professor of Micro- 
biology and Public Health 
Franklin D. Yoder, M.D., Professor of Public Health; Senior Member, Center 

for Zoonoses Research 



COOPERATING STAFF MEMBERS 

From the Library 

Marian Theresa Estep, A.M., Veterinary Medicine Librarian (with rank of 
Assistant Professor) 

From the State Department of Agriculture 

Harold Neil Becker, B.S., D.V.M., Veterinarian I 

Rudolph Kodras, Ph.D., Chemist I 

Bronislaw Mexdlowski, M.R.C.V.S., Veterinarian II 

Edwin Ivan Pilchard, Jr., D.V.M., M.S., Veterinarian III, Supervisor 

Amos Powers Wilson, D.V.M., Veterinarian I 



COLLEGE OF VETERINARY MEDICINE 

The College of Veterinary Medicine of the University of Illinois was 
established in 1944. A professional four-year course leading to the 
Doctor of Veterinary Medicine (D.V.M.) degree was established in 1948, 
and the first class of the College was graduated in 1952. The College 
was advanced from an undergraduate to a professional status in 1957. 

Although one of the newer colleges of the University of Illinois, 
Veterinary Medicine is not a newcomer from the standpoint of tradition. 
A course in veterinary science was taught at the University as early as 
1870, three years after the institution was chartered as the Illinois Indus- 
trial University. In 1899, a Department of Veterinary Science was estab- 
lished in the College of Agriculture. This department was replaced by 
the Division of Pathology and Hygiene in 1917. Two years later, a 
building on south campus was remodeled and designated as the Animal 
Pathology Laboratory and Clinic Building. 

In 1927, a part-time program of extension teaching was formally 
organized and emphasis was placed on disease prevention by proper 
sanitation, herd and flock management, laboratory aids in diagnosis, and 
the prevention and control of infectious abortion in cattle and swine. 
Four years later, the Illinois State Department of Agriculture began 
cooperating with the Division of Animal Pathology and Hygiene to 
provide expanded diagnostic service for the entire animal population 
of the state. This arrangement between the State Department of Agri- 
culture and the College of Veterinary Medicine continues to afford its 
advantages. 

In 1940, the Division of Animal Pathology and Hygiene became a 
Department in the College of Agriculture. This unit was made one of 
the four departments of the College of Veterinary Medicine in 1944. 



OBJECTIVES 

A major objective of the College of Veterinary Medicine is to im- 
prove the means of combating livestock diseases on Illinois farms. The 
prevention and control of diseases of all species of animals, including 
those common to man and others of the animal kingdom, is, nevertheless, 
the responsibility and obligation of the College. This objective is accom- 
plished, in part, by thorough, intensive training of qualified students in 
the science and art of veterinary medicine. Of growing importance is 
the role of the veterinarian in public health. Involved are many phases, 
e.g., inspection and control of food quality and wholesomeness to regu- 
lation of animal transport, import, export, quarantine, testing and re- 
search on the zoonoses — the diseases transmissible between human 
beings and others of the animal kingdom. The health of pet, zoo, and 
wild animals is also a large obligation of the veterinarian. Three major 

RADIOLOGY INSTRUCTION 




10 



activities — teaching, public service, and research — serve in the fulfill- 
ment of these objectives by the College. 

Teaching is of two kinds — resident and extension. Resident teach- 
ing is at the undergraduate, professional, and graduate levels. Extension 
teaching is carried on largely in rural communities but reaches into 
urban areas as well. It includes on-campus meetings, conferences, and 
special courses. 

The service program incorporates the important functions of disease 
detection, diagnosis, and control. Many take advantage of the services 
provided by the large and small animal clinics, the diagnostic laboratory, 
and the ambulatory service. Operation of these services provides essen- 
tial teaching patients and experience for students. 

Research toward better means and methods of overcoming the risks 
and ravages of diseases is a vital function of the College. Many of the 
College's research projects are concerned with serious communicable 
diseases including the zoonoses such as leptospirosis, Q fever, parasitisms, 
and rabies. Investigations are also conducted on noninfectious diseases — 
nutritional, toxic, and hereditary. 

FACILITIES 

The College occupies several buildings and areas including the 
veterinary medical basic sciences unit located on Pennsylvania Avenue. 
The four-story, modern, brick building provides offices, laboratories, and 
classrooms essential for teaching and research. 

The veterinary medical students have access to the excellent Uni- 
versity library and to other college libraries on the campus in addition 
to their own library located on the second floor of the Veterinary Med- 
icine Building. The veterinary medical library contains approximately 
ten thousand volumes covering the broad area which constitutes veter- 
inary medicine and related subjects. 

An annex or wing for diagnostic and research work joins the main 
building. 

The Large Animal Clinic is located on Maryland Avenue south of 
the basic science unit. Completed in October, 1955, it is designed to 
accommodate forty-two large animal patients. The Clinic has modern 
surgery and X-ray facilities, pharmacy, recovery rooms, decontamina- 
tion facilities, and feed and equipment storage room. To the west is an 
enclosed service and exercise court. 

The Small Animal Clinic will remain in the old Veterinary Clinic 
building, located at Sixth Street and Taft Drive, until new small animal 
facilities are constructed. These facilities will join the Large Animal 
Clinic building. 



11 



The new, maximal security Veterinary Medical Research Building 
at Florida Avenue and Virginia Drive was completed in 1961 with 
support of federal, private, and University funds. The unit provides 
necessary facilities for the greatly expanding research program on non- 
infectious as well as infectious diseases. An early addition to the research 
and diagnostic annex of the main building will afford essential new 
facilities. Important veterinary medical research is also conducted in 
the Department of Veterinary Research of the Agricultural Experiment 
Station. Available for it are the research farm facilities on South Race 
Street, four miles from the College. 

BOVINE DENTISTRY 




1? 



ADMISSION REQUIREMENTS 

A minimum of sixty semester hours of preveterinary medical in- 
struction is required for admission to the College. Preveterinary medical 
students may register in the College of Agriculture or the College of 
Liberal Arts and Sciences. Equivalent preveterinary instruction may be 
taken at other accredited institutions. Preveterinary medical training 
does not automatically guarantee admission to the College, however. 

Applicants for admission to the College must present not less than 
sixty semester hours of acceptable credit from a recognized college or 
university. Hours earned in military training or physical education are 
not counted in this total. The minimal acceptable grade point average 
is 3.5. In the University of Illinois system, 3.5 is midway between B and 
C. The sixty semester hours must be distributed as follows: 

Hours 

Chemistry (including organic and quantitative analysis) 16 

Biological Science (botany and general zoology) 8 

Physics (including laboratory) 8 

Foreign Language 1 6 

English Composition and Rhetoric 6 

Electives in not less than two of the following fields: economics (including agricultural 
economics), fine arts, language, geography, history, literature, philosophy, political 
science, psychology, sociology, speech. Approximately one-half of these credits 
must be in the following fields: anthropology, economics, geography, history, 

political science, psychology, or sociology 9 

Free Electives 7 

Total 60 

1 One year of a foreign language at the college level or three years of a foreign 
language from an accredited high school. Students with two years of credit in 
a foreign language may take the University of Illinois proficiency examinations 
in the same language. Passing these examinations satisfies the requirement of 
one year (6 hours) of college language courses. 

Proficiency in the use of written English is required. Students who 
receive grades of C or D in Rhetoric 102 or its equivalent are required 
to pass an English qualifying examination. Those who fail to pass the 
examination are required to complete an extra semester course in rhetoric 
(Rhetoric 200). 

Limitation of enrollment of students in the professional College 
curriculum is mandatory because of limited facilities. In selecting stu- 
dents for admission, scholarship in preveterinary medical subjects and 
character references are considered. Aptitude testing, general and pro- 
fessional, together with personal interviews, also serves in the careful 
screening of students. Preference is given to residents of Illinois and to 
Illinois service veterans. 



13 



Information regarding admission requirements may be obtained by 
writing to the Dean of Admissions and Records, 100a Administration 
Building, University of Illinois, Urbana, Illinois. 

Applications for admission to the school year which begins in Sep- 
tember should be submitted to the Dean of Admissions and Records not 
later than April. A fee of $30 must accompany the admission application. 
It will be applied to tuition and fees for the first semester or returned 
if the student is not accepted for entry. 

PREVETERINARY MEDICINE CURRICULUM 

Specific courses and hours listed apply to preveterinary medical stu- 
dents attending the University of Illinois. 

FIRST YEAR 

First Semester 18 or 19 Hours Second Semester 16 to 19 Hours 

Rhetoric and Composition (Rhet. 101) 3 Rhetoric and Composition (Rhet. 102) 3 

General Zoology (Zool. 101) 5 General Botany (Bot. 1 00) 4 

General Chemistry (Chem. 101 or 102). .5 or 3 Inorganic Chemistry and Qualitative 

Trigonometry (Math. 1 1 4 or 1 04) 2 or 3 Analysis (Chem. 1 05) 5 

Military (men) 1 Military (men) 1 

Physical Education 1 Physical Education 1 

Electives 2 or 3 Electives 4 to 7 

SECOND YEAR 

First Semester 16 to 18 Hours Second Semester 16 to 18 Hours 

General Physics (Physics 101) 5 General Physics (Physics 102) 5 

Language 4 Language 4 

Quantitative Analysis (Chem. 122), or Organic Chemistry (Chem. 133), or 

Organic Chemistry (Chem. 133) 5 Quantitative Analysis (Chem. 122) 5 

Military (men) 1 Military (men) 1 

Physical Education 1 Physical Education 1 

Electives 2 to 4 Electives 2 to 4 



THE CURRICULUM 

The first two years in the College of Veterinary Medicine are devoted 
largely to basic professional subjects such as anatomy, biochemistry, 
physiology, bacteriology, pathology, parasitology, and pharmacology. 
These courses are the foundation for the applied work of the final two 
years. In addition to the basic courses, selected courses are required in 
animal science and dairy science. 

The third year represents a transitional stage in the training of the 
professional student. The courses are of scmiapplied and applied nature 
and I nun a bridge; between the fundamental work of the first two years 
and the clinical work of the fourth year. The courses of the final two 
yean include pharmacology, general and special surgery, diseases of 



14 



small animals, diseases of large animals, breeding problems and obstetrics, 
public health, and clinical and laboratory practice. 

The major portion of the instruction in the fourth year is in labora- 
tory and clinical practice. It affords the students ample opportunity to 
apply knowledge gained in the classroom and laboratory to the diagnosis, 
treatment, and prevention of animal diseases. Courses in radiology, 
diseases of poultry, infectious diseases of large animals, food hygiene and 
public health, jurisprudence, business methods and ethics, clinical 
pathology conference, and seminar complete the period of formal edu- 
cation. 

The third- and fourth-year classes are divided into groups with 
rotating assignments in the various clinical services. The fourth-year 

SURGERY INSTRUCTION 




15 



class spends two days at the Dixon Springs Agricultural Experiment Sta- 
tion at Robbs, Illinois, where the students participate in the fall roundup 
and gain valuable experience in the handling, examination, and treat- 
ment of disease in range cattle. During the spring semester, the third- 
and fourth-year classes take field trips to selected packing and food 
and dairy processing plants in the Chicago and other areas. In addition, 
they are afforded practical observations of and contact with public health 
agencies and their programs; with the activities of the biological and 
pharmaceutical industry; with zoological gardens and animal colonies; 
and with industrial, University, and other research programs. 



VETERINARY MEDICINE CURRICULUM 

FIRST YEAR Credit 

First Semester Hours 

An. Sci. 110 — Plant and Animal 

Genetics 3 

Chem. 354 — Biochemistry 5 

V.A. 300— Gross Anatomy. .. . 5 
V.A. 301— Microscopic 

Anatomy 5 

V.P.H. 330— Veterinary 

Medical History and 

Orientation 1 



Clock 
Hours 



Credit 
Second Semester Hours 

An. Nutr. 351 — Principles of 

Animal Nutrition 3 

V.A. 302 — Gross Anatomy. ... 4 

V.A. 303 — Microscopic and 

Developmental Anatomy. ... 5 

V.P.H. 331— Veterinary 

Bacteriology 5 

V.P.P. 315 — Physiology 3 



Total 



19 



35 



Total 



20 



SECOND YEAR 
First Semester 

An. Sci. 220 — Feeds and 



Second Semester 

An. Sci. 201— Animal 



Clock 
Hours 



35 



Feeding 


3 


4 


Management 


4 


4 


V.P.H. 332— Veterinary Mi- 






V.P.H. 335 — Special Pathology 


5 


9 


crobiology and Immunology. . 


4 


7 


V.P.H. 336— Helminth Parasites 


3 


5 


V.P.H. 333 — Protozoan and 






V.P.P. 317— Physiology. . 


3 


6 


Arthropod Parasites 


3 


5 


V.P.P. 318 — Pharmacology 


4 


6 


VP.H. 334 — General 






V.P.P. 319— Veterinary Radio 






Pathology 


5 


8 


Physiology 


1 


2 


V.P.P. 316 — Physiology 


4 


8 


Total 






Total 


19 


32 


20 


32 


THIRD YEAR 












First Semester 






Second Semester 






Ani. Sci. 304 — Poultry 






V.A. 304 — Applied Anatomy. . 


2 


3 


Management 


3 


3 


V.C.M. 363 — Breeding 






V.C.M. 360 — Diseases of Small 






Problems and Obstetrics. . . . 


5 


6 


Animals 


5 


5 


V.C.M. 364 — Diseases of 






V.C.M. 361 — General Surgery 


4 


5 


Large Animals 


5 


5 


V.C.M. 362 — Clinical and 






V.C.M. 365 — Special Surgery 


4 


10 


Laboratory Practice 


2 


7 


V.C.M. 366 — Clinical 






V.P.H. 337— Clinical Pathology 






Laboratory Practice 


2 


6 


Conference 





1 


V.C.M. 367— Radiology 


2 


3 


V.P.H. 338 — Clinical Pathology 


2 


4 


V.P.H. 337— Clinical 






V.P.P. 320 — Pharmacology 






Pathology Conference 





1 


and Toxicology 


4 


8 
33 


Total 






Total 


?0 


20 


34 



It 




ADVANCED WORK WITH ELECTRON MICROSCOPE 



FOURTH YEAR 






First Semester 






V.C.M. 368 — Diseases of 

Large Animals 


4 


4 


V.C.M. 369— Diseases of Small 
Animals 


2 


2 


V.C.M. 370— Seminar 


1 


1 


V.C.M. 371— Clinical and 

Laboratory Practice 


8 


29 


V.P.H. 339— Clinical Pathology 
Conference 





1 


V.P.H. 340— Diseases of 

Poultry 

*V.P.H. 346 — Management and 
Diseases of Laboratory 


3 
2 


3 
2 






Total 


8-20 


40-42 



Second Semester 

Accy. 203 — Accountancy 2 

V.C.M. 372— Veterinary 

Jurisprudence and Ethics. ... 3 

V.C.M. 373— Seminar 1 

V.C.M. 374 — Clinical and 

Laboratory Practice 8 

'V.P.P. 324— Nutritional 

Deficiencies 2 

V.P.H. 339— Clinical Pathology 

Conference 

V.P.H. 341— Food Hygiene 

and Public Health 5 

V.P.H. 348 — Environment and 

Disease in Livestock 

Production 2 



3 

1 

28 
2 
1 
6 



Total 19-21 41-43 



* Choice of either elective V.P.P. 324, V.P.H. 348, or V.P.H. 346 is made by students in 
fourth year. 



17 



GRADUATION REQUIREMENTS 

Students who have passed all courses in the first two years of the 
veterinary medical curriculum and who have a grade-point average of 
3.0 or better for these courses are eligible for the degree of Bachelor of 
Science in Veterinary Medicine. 

Students who have passed all courses in the veterinary medical cur- 
riculum and who have a grade-point average of 3.0 or better for these 
courses are eligible for the degree of Doctor of Veterinary Medicine. 

GRADING SYSTEM 

Grade designations are A, B, C, D, and E. D is the lowest passing 
grade and E is failure. The computation of individual averages is as 
follows: A = 5 points; B = 4; C = 3; D = 2; and E = 1. The credit 
points for a course are computed by multiplying the credit hours by the 
credit points of the letter grade. 

TUITION AND FEES 

There are certain fixed expenses that each student should be prepared 
to meet. The list below covers fixed fees and expenses for two semesters: 

Tuition — Illinois residents $170.00 

Nonresidents 520.00 

Service fee 80.00 

Hospital-medical-surgical insurance fee 20.00 

Textbooks (approximate) 75.00 

Supplies (approximate) 35.00 

Total — Illinois residents $380.00 

Nonresidents 730.00 

Students are not required to purchase microscopes. 

Room and board costs vary from $750 to $860 yearly, depending on 

the accommodations. University-owned residence halls provide both room 

and board. A list of approved houses is available at the office of the 

off-campus housing supervisor, located in 420 Student Services Building 

page 26 foi further information). 

SCHOLARSHIPS AND LOANS 

A number ol cash scholarships and tuition waiver scholarships are 
awarded by the University of Illinois each year. Some are restricted to 
Specific areas of study, including veterinary medicine, while others are 
available to students in all areas. A superior scholastic record and evi- 



18 



dence of financial need are usually required, and most of the scholar- 
ships are restricted to Illinois residents. The majority of scholarships are 
awarded in the late spring or early summer for the ensuing school year. 
Applications for the first semester, which begins in September, should be 
made as soon as possible after January 1. 

Application forms may be obtained by writing to the Director of the 
Undergraduate Scholarship Program, University of Illinois, 907 South 
Sixth Street, Champaign, Illinois. 

Students in the preveterinary medical curriculum and the first two 
years of the College of Veterinary Medicine may compete with other 
University students for the following scholarships: 

County Scholarships. One county scholarship is awarded to the 
highest ranking candidate in each county. Additional scholarships are 
awarded in counties with populations in excess of 50,000. The candidate 
must be a resident of Illinois and of the county in which the examina- 
tion is written. The value of the scholarships is waiver of tuition for 
four years. 

Veterans' Children's Scholarships. One scholarship is awarded in each 
county to a child of a veteran of World War I, one to a child of a 
veteran of World War II, and one to a child of a veteran who served 
at any time during the national emergency between June 25, 1950, and 
January 31, 1955. Preference is given to candidates whose fathers are 
deceased or disabled. Candidate must be a resident of Illinois and of the 
county. The value of the scholarships is waiver of tuition for four years. 

Illinois General Assembly Scholarships. Each Senator and Represen- 
tative may nominate each year one student from his district for a four- 
year scholarship. Nomination must be made before the beginning of the 
semester. Nominee must be a resident of Illinois and of the district from 
which he is nominated. The value of the scholarships is waiver of tuition 
for four years. 

Military Scholarships. Any veteran who was a resident of Illinois or 
a student at the University of Illinois at the time of enlistment in the 
armed services is eligible for a four-year tuition scholarship. The veteran 
must have served in the armed forces at some time after September, 1940. 
Not eligible are veterans who are receiving financial aid from the federal 
government for educational purposes. 

Illinois State Scholarships. High school seniors who rank in the top 
50 per cent of their graduating classes are eligible. State examinations 
for these scholarships are held each year, and the candidates who have 
the highest grades and who can show financial need are considered. 
High-ranking candidates who do not show financial need are given 



19 



honorary awards. Cash awards are limited to tuition and fees and may 
not exceed $600 a year. These are annual awards, but they can be re- 
newed for three additional years if the holder maintains a satisfactory 
record and shows financial need. 

Fred S. Bailey Scholarships. These scholarships are administered by 
the University Young Men's Christian Association. Awards are in vary- 
ing amounts and are based on superior scholarship, character, and need. 

Work Scholarships for Superior Students. Each year seventy-five 
freshmen are selected for the Work Scholarship Program. Those selected 
receive tuition waiver and employment by the University to enable them 
to earn all or a substantial amount of the cost of meals. Scholarships can 
be renewed from year to year if the holders maintain superior records. 

Non-State Tuition Scholarships. Ten tuition waiver scholarships are 
awarded to outstanding non-state applicants who show financial need. 
Those approved are excused from non-state tuition for a period of four 
years provided they maintain superior records. 

Albert Bellamy Scholarships. Five or six scholarships, $150 to $250 
each. 

F. Stanley Boggs Memorial Scholarships. Alumni and friends of the 
Phi Kappa Sigma fraternity established a fund, the income from which 
is used for scholarships for male students. Awards vary from $200 to 
$300 each and are based on scholarship, need, and participation in 
extracurricular activities. 

Campus Chest Scholarships. Ten to fifteen scholarships are provided 
from funds from Campus Chest. The amounts vary from $150 to $250 
each. 

Chicago llliniweks Scholarship. One scholarship for a junior or sen- 
ior from the Chicago area. Award covers tuition and fees when available. 

Dean Thomas A. Clark Scholarships. Scholarships in varying amounts 
for worthy undergraduate students, established in memory of Thomas A. 
Clark, former Dean of Men at the University of Illinois. 

Bertha L. Compton Memorial Scholarship. A scholarship for a young 
man or woman of good character, who is not a member of a fraternity 
or sorority. The award was established by Mr. W. E. Compton in 
memory of bis mother. The sum is $200 to $250, and the recipient must 
to repa) to the fund, as soon as he conveniently can, the amount 
awarded. 

Foundation Scholarships (11 IF). Approximately sixty scholarships «>i 
$250 i" Sinn each, supported 1>\ gifts to the [llini Achievement Fund. 

Paul V. Galvin Memorial Scholarships. Scholarships established by 



20 



gifts of dealers of Motorola products to honor Paul V. Galvin, founder 
and president of the company. Awards vary in amount. 

General Undergraduate Scholarships. A general fund which supports 
fifty to sixty scholarships each year. Awards vary from $150 to $400 each. 

John M. and Louisa C. Gregory Scholarships. Three or four $100 
awards made each year, on the basis of competitive examinations, Uni- 
versity record, and need, to deserving students who do not use tobacco 
or alcohol. 

Jeanette E. and Benjamin F. Hunter Scholarships. Ten to twelve 
$900 scholarships are awarded each year to young men or women from 
farm homes who have very high scholarship and urgent financial need. 
The awards usually are limited to two years. 

Illini Clubs Scholarships. Scholarships amounting to $150 to $300 
each to undergraduate students. 

Illini Dad's Association Scholarships. Twelve scholarships of $170 
each to six men and six women. 

Illini Mother's Association Scholarships. Four scholarships of $270 
each to two men and two women. 

Illinois State Federation of Labor and Congress of Industrial Organ- 
izations Scholarships. Two scholarships of $500 each to children of union 
members affiliated with the Illinois Federation. One shall be from Cook 
County and one from some other county. They are not renewable. 

Leo and Hilda Kolb Memorial Scholarship. One scholarship of ap- 
proximately $200 awarded to a student from Madison County and 
preferably from Marine Township. 

Mr. and Mrs. C. G. Lamed Scholarships. Awards are made when 
funds are available from a bequest in the will of the late Mary S. Parsons. 

Wensel Morava Scholarships. Eighteen to twenty scholarships vary- 
ing from $200 to $400 each are made to young men and women between 
seventeen and twenty-two years of age who have good health and good 
character. Applicants must be members of a church or Sunday School, 
must agree not to join a fraternity or sorority in their first two years 
under the scholarships, and must agree to assist some other student with 
his or her expenses at the University if financially able to do so. Pref- 
erence is given to students of Czechoslovakian descent. 

Nonacademic Employees Council Scholarship. A scholarship of $250 
for a child of a nonacademic employee at the University of Illinois. 

Mr. and Mrs. Edward North Scholarship. One annual award of 
$750 is made to an outstanding male student from White Hall Com- 
munity High School. 



21 



LaVerne Noyes Scholarships. Approximately fifty men and women 
receive aid to cover tuition and fees. They must be descendants of 
veterans of World War I. 

Peoria Tractor and Equipment Company Scholarships. Several schol- 
arships each year for students from counties served by the company. 
Award varies in amount. 

James D. and Clara Phillips Scholarships. One or two awards of $150 
to $200 each year. 

John C. Ruettinger Memorial Scholarships. Three scholarships of 
$150 to $200 each, established by Mr. John W. Ruettinger in memory of 
his father. 

Phyllis Pierce Ruettinger Memorial Scholarships. Three scholarships 
of $150 to $250 each for women of junior or senior standing, established 
by Mrs. Kitty Pierce in honor of her daughter. 

John T. Rusher Memorial Scholarships. Six to eight scholarships of 
$150 to $250 each, established by Mr. and Mrs. F. T. Rusher in memory 
of their son. Preference is given to applicants from Peoria and Tazewell 
Counties. 

Gretchen Johanna and Paul Charles Schilling Scholarships. One or 
two scholarships not to exceed $500 each are awarded each year from 
income from endowment funds. 

Clara Y. Shaw Scholarships. A substantial number of scholarships 
ranging from $250 to $300 each are awarded from the income from a 
bequest. 

Student Organization Fund Scholarships. Several scholarships of 
$150 to $250 each. 

Lindsey F. Ter Bush Memorial Scholarship. One scholarship of $200. 

Earl C. and Lawrence L. Voodry Scholarship. One scholarship of 
$150. 

Manierre Barlow Ware Scholarships. Two scholarships of $150 to 
$250 each, awarded each year to male students as a memorial by Mr. 
Ware's mother. Preference is given to students in the College of Agri- 
culture. 

W omens League Scholarships. One or two scholarships of $150 to 
$200 each for women. 

Etta and Laura Beach Wright Scholarships. A substantial number of 
< holarships are available from the income from a bequest. The amounts 
vary from $250 to $300 each. 

Harry G. and Harriette A. Wright Scholarships. Twenty scholarships 
of $200 to .$100 plui all fees. Preference is given to students in agricul- 



22 



ture and related fields and to residents of DeKalb, Lee, Randolph, and 
Whiteside Counties. Total amounts vary from $400 to $600 each. 

SCHOLARSHIPS FOR VETERINARY MEDICAL STUDENTS ONLY 

Dr. H. Preston Hoskins Scholarship. This scholarship is given annu- 
ally, in the spring, to the student editor or editors of the Illinois Veter- 
inarian for the ensuing year. Sponsoring organizations are the Illinois 
State Veterinary Medical Association and the Chicago Veterinary Med- 
ical Association. 

Maywood Trotting Association Scholarships. Two scholarships of 
$500 each are awarded to first- and second-year veterinary students. 

American Breeders Service Scholarship. To promote a closer under- 
standing between the veterinarian and the A.I. technicians, the ABS has 
established a scholarship for a forthcoming senior. Attendance at ABS 
Technical Training School is required to validate the scholarship. 

LOANS 

Certain loan funds have been established to aid University students. 
These funds are available to students in the College of Veterinary Med- 
icine and to preveterinary medical students enrolled in other colleges of 
the University. One year of residency at the University is usually required 
before a student may apply for a loan. 

University Loans. The maximum amount that may be loaned to any 
student to be outstanding at one time is $2,500. All notes are payable in 
graduated monthly installments beginning four months after termination 
of status as a full-time student. The total amount borrowed by the student 
must be paid no later than four years following graduation or withdrawal. 
The interest rate is 3 per cent to maturity, beginning four months after 
borrower ceases to be a full-time student, and 6 per cent after maturity. 

National Defense Loan (Federal). This loan has a limitation of 
$1,000 each year (July 1 to June 30) with a maximum not to exceed 
$5,000 for any one borrower. The interest rate is 3 per cent per year, 
beginning one year after graduation or withdrawal from an institution 
of higher learning. 

Knights Templar Educational Loan. The amount is $1,200 for the 
last year of the curriculum, or $750 for each of the last two years. The 
maximum to any one student will not exceed $1,500. The interest rate 
is 4 per cent per year from the date of graduation. 

Knights of Columbus Foundation Loan. For residents of Wisconsin 
only. Information can be obtained from the Chairman of the Loan Com- 
mittee of the Wisconsin State Council. 

The Merrit Credit Bureau Foundation Loan. Maximum amount is 



23 



$600 for any academic year. Note matures after graduation, and a repay- 
ment schedule can be arranged. Interest is 3 per cent a year and begins 
to accrue from the date of departure. 

Higher Education Assistance Corporation Loans. The states of New 
York, New Jersey, and Indiana have Higher Education Assistance agen- 
cies where students may borrow money to continue in higher education. 
Information is available from the Superintendent of Public Instruction 
in the respective states or from national and state banks in the appli- 
cant's home locality. Illinois has authorized a similar corporation which 
is not yet functioning. 

Pickett and Hatcher Educational Fund. Information may be obtained 
by writing the home office: Pickett and Hatcher Educational Fund, 
P. O. Box 1238, Columbus, Georgia. 

Women's Auxiliary, American Veterinary Medical Association Loan. 
Seniors receive preference; however, consideration may be given to jun- 
iors and graduate students. The maximum amount of the loan is $400, 
and the interest rate is 2 per cent a year, the principal to be repaid two 
years from date of loan and the remainder three years from date. 

Champaign Kennel Club Fund. Loans available from this fund will 
depend on the amount in the fund at the time the loan is requested. 

College Loan Fund. Small loans on a short-term basis will be made 
for emergencies. 

For additional information on any of these loans, contact the Office 
of the Dean of Students or the Office of the Dean of the College of 
Veterinary Medicine, University of Illinois, Urbana, Illinois. 

AWARDS 

Dr. Lester E. Fisher Award. Fifty dollars is given for proficiency in 
small animal clinical work. 

Illinois Veterinary Alumni Association Award. Twenty-five dollars 
is presented for proficiency in clinical medicine. 

Illinois Veterinary Medical Alumni Association Editorial Awards. 
Fifty dollars and the title of Associate Editor of the Illinois Veterinarian 
are given annually to each of two third-year students. Twenty-five dollars 
and the title of Assistant Editor of the Illinois Veterinarian arc given 
annually to each of two second-year students. 

Moss Essay Contest. The winner of first place in this contest receives 
$25; second place, $15; and third place, $10. 

Omega lau Sigma Award. The fraternity annually honors a senior 
Itudent member who has demonstrated high academic and extracurricular 



24 



achievement. The student's name is inscribed on a permanent plaque 
which hangs in the college library. In addition, the student is presented 
a gift. 

Women's Auxiliary of the American Veterinary Medical Association 
Award. Fifty dollars is presented to the fourth-year student doing the 
most to advance the standing of the veterinary profession on campus. 

GRADUATE STUDY 

A program of graduate study leading to advanced degrees — Master 
of Science and Doctor of Philosophy — in Veterinary Medical Science is 
offered. Students may specialize in the various disciplines or areas, e.g., 
anatomy, microbiology, parasitology, pathology, pharmacology, and phys- 
iology offered by the College and involving other departments of the 
Graduate College. Research programs are both fundamental and applied. 
The major objective of graduate study is to qualify the candidate for 
veterinary medical research in various areas including clinical specialties 
and for teaching. 

STUDENT HEALTH SERVICE 

The Health Service of the University provides routine clinical, labora- 
tory, and X-ray services for all students. Consultation is available on 
personal matters of a medical nature and on dental and psychiatric 
problems. 

In addition, students are eligible for admission and may receive 
services as outpatients at McKinley Hospital, which operates on the 
campus under the Health Service. Hospitalization for students is covered 
by student insurance. A Health Service physician is in residence at the 
hospital after the regular hours of the Health Center. He provides emer- 
gency service and admits patients to the hospital if they have not been 
seen by a private physician prior to admission. 

STUDENT EMPLOYMENT 

Many students work part time while attending school. Because of the 
large number of classroom hours required of veterinary medical students, 
however, it is recommended that outside work be kept at a minimum. 

Some veterinary medical students are employed on the College's re- 
search projects as technicians, assistants, and animal caretakers, and in 
other University departments as laboratory assistants. Such work offers 
both income and valuable experience to the prospective veterinarian. 
Other students find board or board-and-room employment. The Student 



25 



Employment Office, a division of the Dean of Students' Office, provides 
information and assistance to the student who seeks part-time work. 

LIVING ARRANGEMENTS 

The Housing Division offers current information on all types of 
accomodations for undergraduate, graduate, married, and single students. 
It issues application forms for space in University-operated residence 
halls, provides lists of rooms available in other approved residences, and 
supervises standards of safety, health, comfort, and study conditions in 
housing units in which undergraduate and professional men and women 
live. 

Students are requested to contact the Housing Division by mail or in 
person immediately after applying for admission to the University. They 
will then receive copies of the Handbook of Student Housing, lists of 
current vacancies, area maps, etc., and will be given definite instructions 
on how to apply for space in the particular type of unit in which they 
are interested and which will best serve their individual needs. 

ORGANIZATIONS 

STUDENT CHAPTER OF THE AMERICAN VETERINARY MEDICAL ASSOCIATION 

A center of student activities in the College of Veterinary Medicine 
is the student chapter of the American Veterinary Medical Association. 
Similar organizations are found at all recognized veterinary schools and 
colleges in the United States and Canada. 

Activities of the student chapter at Illinois include social gatherings, 
sponsorship of the Preveterinary Medical Student Club, the annual wel- 
come to first-year students, alumni dance, student-staff spring picnic, and 
spring dinner-dance. Guest speakers on many phases of veterinary medi- 
cine and on other subjects appear on semimonthly programs. The 
chapter sponsors intramural athletic teams such as basketball, football, 
softball, and bowling. 

OMEGA TAU SIGMA 

The National Fraternity established Theta Chapter on the campus in 
1956. The purpose of this organization is to develop broadly educated, 
public spirited veterinarians. 

Membership is open to any member of the student body of the 
College. The organization functions efficiently to provide effective rela- 
tionships outside the classroom, including group participation in educa- 
tional and social gatherings. 



26 




VETERINARY MEDICINE BUILDING 
ALUMNI ASSOCIATION 

Graduates of the College have formed the University of Illinois 
Veterinary Medical Alumni Association. The Association is designed to 
create broader professional acquaintance among its members, to afford 
opportunity for increasing professional knowledge, to maintain mutually 
beneficial contact with the College, and to counsel with the student body 
and faculty. 

WOMEN'S AUXILIARY OF THE STUDENT CHAPTER 

OF THE AMERICAN VETERINARY MEDICAL ASSOCIATION 

The Auxiliary of the Illinois student chapter is open to wives of 
veterinary medical students. The Auxiliary meets monthly in the audito- 
rium of the Veterinary Medicine Building to hear guest speakers on topics 
related to the veterinary medical profession as well as other topics. Also, 
the group sponsors social events such as the wives' banquet for husbands, 
a farewell party for wives, and other activities. 

RECREATIONAL ACTIVITIES 

Athletic facilities at the University include Memorial Stadium, which 
seats 71,000 and serves for football games and track meets. The new 
Assembly Hall, to be completed by 1963, provides excellent facilities for 
athletic events, concerts, and other large group gatherings. The Armory, 
with its cinder track and nets suspended from the ceiling, permits in addi- 



27 



tion to the Reserve Officers' Training Program activities, indoor track 
meets and early season baseball practice. Illinois Field has freshman and 
varsity baseball diamonds, a quarter-mile track, and tennis courts. The 
Ice Skating Rink serves for recreational skating and physical education 
classes. 

The Illini Union student activities organization is in charge of many 
activities in the Illini Union Building and of all-campus activities at 
Urbana-Champaign, such as Homecoming, Dad's Day, Mother's Day, etc. 
The Illini Union Building has lounges, food services, meeting and game 
rooms, browsing library, ticket sales and information desks, and other 
services. 

OPPORTUNITIES FOR VETERINARIANS 

A wide horizon of endeavor and service awaits the graduate in 
veterinary medicine. Although 60 per cent of all our country's vet- 
erinarians are engaged in some kind of practice, there are many other 
opportunities for contributions through public service, in teaching and 
research, in public health, in regulatory endeavor at the national, state, 
and local levels, as well as inspection activities, food sanitation, and 
related undertakings. The needs and opportunities for graduate vet- 
erinarians are growing in several phases of teaching, including extension, 
and in research. Industry depends on veterinary medical skill for the 
production of biological and pharmaceutical products, in its education 
and sales efforts, and for field service. 

The United States Department of Agriculture maintains a full-time 
staff of about 1,500 veterinarians whose principal assignments are the 
inspection for wholesomeness and safety of the meat processed in fed- 
erally inspected packing plants and at ports; field work in animal disease 
detection, suppression, and eradication forms another segment. By in- 
specting animals before, at the time of, and after slaughter, as well as 
during processing operations, veterinarians detect and exclude unsafe 
meat and meat products. 

Other opportunities in the Department of Agriculture include stock- 
yards supervision, poultry inspection, enforcement of import and export 
regulations, research on animal health problems, and licensing and super- 
vision of the manufacture of serums and vaccines for animals. 

I In- Army and Air Force also require a substantial number of vet- 
erinarians fol the inspection of foods, especially meat and dairy products 
(to prevenl unwholesome or poor-quality foods from being served to 
troops), and lot diagnosis and research, including many new and impor- 
tant phases < >f space medicine. Other agencies dial, engage the coiii- 



21 



petence of veterinarians are the United States Public Health Service and 
the Food and Drug Administration. United States veterinarians also 
serve with international agencies such as the World Health Organization 
and the Pan-American Health Organization. 

Many states and municipalities employ veterinarians for disease 
control and eradication work. These veterinarians cooperate with 
federal and local as well as private practitioners, and with public health 
veterinarians in testing and diagnosis, in environmental sanitation of 
packing houses and food establishments, and in the control of meat, milk, 
and other animal food products. 

Rapid developments in the nuclear sciences have created problems 
of contamination by radio-active fallout. The public has been alerted to 
the need for veterinary medical aid in reducing the danger of exposure 
of food-producing animals and contamination of meat and milk. Vet- 
erinarians are informed in the ways of protecting animals against these 
hazards and safeguarding this important segment of our food and econ- 
omy. 

Other opportunities involve keeping healthy the animals in zoos and 
public parks, racing stables, animal colonies for medical and veterinary 
medical research, fur farms, circuses, ranches, and humane society 
shelters. 



29 



COLLEGE OF VETERINARY MEDICINE 

ADVISORY COMMITTEE 

1961-64 MR. F. W. ANDERSON, MORRIS 

1962-65 MR. DONALD I. DEAN, CHAMPAIGN 

1960-63 DR. GEORGE F. FEHRENBACHER, WYOMING 

1960-63 DR. C. A. KRAKOWER, CHICAGO 

1962-65 MR. A. B. McCONNELL, WOODSTOCK 

1960-63 MR. R. V. McKEE, WASHBURN 

1960-63 DR. O. NORLING-CHRISTENSEN, WILMETTE 

1960-63 DR. W. G. RAUDABAUGH, PIPER CITY 

1960-63 MR. STILLMAN J. STANARD, MAKANDA 



UNIVERSITY OF ILLINOIS-URBANA 



3 0112 110343503